BALLOON-POWERED INTERNET FOR SRI-LANKA

Wednesday, July 29th, 2015

Most likely the 1st country in the world to get 100% coverage by Google’s project loon

Foreign Ministry, today announced on behalf of the Government of Sri Lanka a historic initiative to cover the entire country with affordable high-speed internet in partnership with Google.

Using high altitude balloons Google Loon will cover every inch of Sri Lanka with seamless access to the internet. Sri Lanka is now on its way to becoming the first country in the world to have universal internet coverage.

The Foreign minister noted that “from this event onwards advertisements or headlines saying “Matara covered” or “Jaffna covered” will become a part of history.”  And concluded his speech saying that he was “proud to declare that we are at the cusp of a reclaiming our heritage of being connected to each other and connected to the world. In a few months we will truly be able to say: Sri Lanka. Covered”

This initiative would not have been possible without the support of LotusFlare, whose chairperson is a visionary member of the Sri Lankan diaspora, Chamath Palihapitya, and Project RAMA

 

WHAT IS PROJECT LOON?

Many of us think of the Internet as a global community. But two-thirds of the world’s population does not yet have Internet access. Project Loon is a network of balloons traveling on the edge of space, designed to connect people in rural and remote areas, help fill coverage gaps, and bring people back online after disasters.

 

THE TECHNOLOGY

Project Loon balloons float in the stratosphere, twice as high as airplanes and the weather. In the stratosphere, there are many layers of wind, and each layer of wind varies in direction and speed. Loon balloons go where they’re needed by rising or descending into a layer of wind blowing in the desired direction of travel. By partnering with Telecommunications companies to share cellular spectrum we’ve enabled people to connect to the balloon network directly from their phones and other LTE-enabled devices. The signal is then passed across the balloon network and back down to the global Internet on Earth.